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In this Jan. 18, 2018 photo, former Brazilian President Luiz Ignacio Lula da Silva speaks during a meeting with artists and intellectuals in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Da Silva is facing charges in six other cases. Among the accusations against him are that he received kickbacks in the form of properties for performing favors and accepted bribes from Odebrecht in exchange for helping the construction giant secure credit lines from the state development bank. Da Silva’s defense team has rejected all of the accusations, saying evidence is lacking or invented and that prosecutors and judges are persecuting him because they want to stain his time in office and prevent him from running for president again. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
AP Explains: What's next for Brazil's da Silva after appealAP Explains: A look at the case against Brazil's former President da Silva ahead of his appeal and what's next for the politician
The Associated Press26 minutes ago
The town sign stands in the snow at the entrance to Davos, Switzerland, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. The 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, takes place in the city and brings together entrepreneurs, scientists, chief executives and political leaders from Jan. 23 to 26. (AP Photo/David Keyton)
India's Modi to pitch country's credentials to Davos forumThe World Economic Forum officially gets underway Tuesday with Indian leader Narendra Modi offering the keynote speech
The Associated Press30 minutes ago
Bank of Japan Gov. Haruhiko Kuroda arrives at the BOJ headquarters in Tokyo Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. The BOJ has opted to keep intact its unprecedented monetary stimulus despite stronger than expected growth. (Naohiko Hatta/Kyodo News via AP)
Japan central bank keeps lax monetary policy unchangedThe Bank of Japan has opted to keep intact its unprecedented monetary stimulus despite signs the economy is gaining steam
The Associated Press33 minutes ago
South Korea's Financial Services Commission Vice Chair Kim Yong-beom, center, speaks at the government complex in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. South Korea said Tuesday that local banks will launch a real-name system for crypto currency trading that make anonymous transactions to be traceable as the country seeks to curb speculation and criminal activities. (Kim Seung-doo/Yonhap via AP)
South Korea to start real-name trading of crypto currencySouth Korean says local banks will launch a real-name system for crypto currency trading and report suspicious activities to authorities starting next week
The Associated Press34 minutes ago
Hope, fear as Puerto Rico moves to privatize power companyPuerto Ricans divided between hope, fear as U.S. territory moves to privatize power company
The Associated Press40 minutes ago
Deputy head of China's energy agency fired in graft probeChina's anti-corruption agency says the deputy head of the Cabinet agency in charge of energy policy for the world's second-largest economy has been fired
The Associated Press45 minutes ago
File- This Feb. 1, 2017, file photo shows Affordable Solar president Kevin Bassalleck talking about the full-time positions his company will create as Gov. Susana Martinez listens during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M. Some in the U.S. solar-power industry are hoping a decision this week by President Donald Trump doesn’t bring on an eclipse. Companies that install solar-power systems for homeowners and utilities are bracing for Trump’s call on whether to slap tariffs on imported panels. Bassalleck, said tariffs would hurt homegrown companies that make racks, tracking systems and electronics that are part of a power system. He said jobs at those companies are hard to outsource.  (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
Trump applies tariffs to solar panels, washing machinesPresident Donald Trump approves tariffs on imported solar panels, washing machines; says move will protect US industry, jobs
The Associated Press1 hour ago
Cord-cutter streaming services are off to a flying start, but how long can they last?2017 was the year that live TV streaming services came out of the nerd corner and truly became mainstream. AT&T's DirecTV Now, Hulu's Live TV, and YouTube TV all launched or grew exponentially in the last 12 months, and according to a new report from CNBC, the subscriber numbers have stopped being a rounding error and have started to mean something. But at the same time, there's no indication that all those subscribers are actually making companies money. Nationwide competition for subscribers, transparent pricing on bundles, and the fierce deals being offered to subscribers in order to get them to sign up mean that margins are being squeezed. Sources familiar with industry pricing have told BGR that most providers are breaking even or suffering a small loss, and Christmas promotions put some streaming services "completely underwater." First, let's look at the good news: subscribers are signing up for streaming services in record numbers, and they're staying once they join. We already found out last year that DirecTV Now has over a million subscribers, but now CNBC suggests that YouTube TV and Hulu Live TV are a success as well. Hulu reportedly has 450,000 paying subscribers for its service, while YouTube (which has been rolling out on a more regional basis) is at 300,000. Pricing for Hulu, YouTube TV and DirecTV Now is remarkably similar. Hulu and DirecTV Now both start at $35 per month, which gets you a mix of news, entertainment and sports channels. Premium add-ons like HBO or Showtime are available for $10-15 more per month. At that price point, one source told BGR, the streaming services are falling a few dollars per month short of covering the cost of programming. Networks have been slowly increasing the cost of programming for the last few years, especially for must-have channels like sports, but thanks to the competition in the streaming TV market, the streaming services haven't been able to pass the cost on to consumers. Instead, margins have been nibbled away, leaving an expensive-to-run service that barely breaks even. When promotional activity, like 3-month free trials or free streaming devices are including, any profits vanish completely. In some cases, that might be a tactical decision -- AT&T gives away DirecTV Now for $10 a month to its wireless customers, taking a loss on the TV package in order to retain valuable postpaid cellular accounts -- but the overall picture for streaming TV companies is a little bleak. While over-the-top streaming services certainly appear to be the future, the industry may not survive in its current form, where middle-men streaming services exist as a middle step between the content owners and customers. If the profits for distributors vanish, there's a good chance that content owners will simply take up distribution themselves. That's already happening: Disney is planning its own streaming service, Netflix carries more and more original programming, and even companies like Amazon and Verizon are buying up the rights to stream sports to their customers on demand.
BGR1 hour ago
File- This Feb. 1, 2017, file photo shows Affordable Solar president Kevin Bassalleck talking about the full-time positions his company will create as Gov. Susana Martinez listens during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M. Some in the U.S. solar-power industry are hoping a decision this week by President Donald Trump doesn’t bring on an eclipse. Companies that install solar-power systems for homeowners and utilities are bracing for Trump’s call on whether to slap tariffs on imported panels. Bassalleck, said tariffs would hurt homegrown companies that make racks, tracking systems and electronics that are part of a power system. He said jobs at those companies are hard to outsource.  (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
China criticizes Trump tariffs on solar, washing machinesChina is criticizing U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to approve higher tariffs on solar power components and washing machines as an abuse of trade remedies
The Associated Press1 hour ago
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