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Pastor Danny Daniels poses for a photo inside his Better Life Community Church in Lindsay, Okla., Friday, June 15, 2018. Daniels is among a growing group of traditionally conservative Republican voters who have shifted their position in favor of medical marijuana and who could ensure passage on Tuesday of the first medical marijuana state question on a ballot this year. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma conservatives' views on medical marijuana evolvingHere's a twist: Evangelical Christians in Oklahoma could be the reason medical marijuana is approved on Tuesday
The Associated Press1 hour ago
Dying Man Gets His Day in Court Against MonsantoDeWayne Johnson is going to die—but first, he will see the company he blames for his cancer in court. Johnson, a 46-year-old father of three, is the first of hundreds of cancer patients suing Monsanto to have his case go to trial, the International Business Times reports. The California...
Newser3 hours ago
Some of the materials used by the Oklahoma City County Health Department in the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program are on display at the health department in Oklahoma City, Monday, July 21, 2014. The 25th annual Kids Count report from the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation ranked Oklahoma 39th in 16 indicators across four areas: economic well-being, education, health and family and community. Teen births among girls ages 15 to 19 years old decreased 13 percent, from 54 teen births per 1,000 in 2005 to 47 teen births per 1,000 in 2012. Several affiliates of Planned Parenthood are suing the Department of Health and Human Services over its efforts to impose an abstinence-only focus on its Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program that has served more than 1 million young people. The lawsuits were filed Friday, June 22, 2018, in federal courts in New York City and Spokane, Washington, by four different Planned Parenthood affiliates covering New York City and the states of Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska and Washington. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
Lawsuits challenge efforts to push abstinence-only on teensSeveral affiliates of Planned Parenthood are suing the Department of Health and Human Services over its efforts to impose an abstinence-only focus on its Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program that has served more than 1 million young people
The Associated Press20 hours ago
FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2015 file photo supporters of a measure to allow terminally ill people to end their own life march at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. California health officials say 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives in 2017, the first full year after a law making the option legal took effect. They added, 577 people received aid-in-dying drugs in 2017, but not everyone used them. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
Nearly 400 people used California assisted death law in 2017California health officials say 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives last year in the first full year after a 2016 law made the option legal
The Associated Press21 hours ago
House approves bill expanding treatment for opioid abuseThe House has overwhelmingly approved legislation designed to give health care providers more tools to stem an opioid crisis that kills more than 115 people in the United States daily
The Associated Press1 day ago
File - In this April 20, 2018 file photo, Zechariah Jacobs shops for marijuana at the Exhale Nevada dispensary in Las Vegas. Nevada's marijuana regulators say they are trying to keep up with demands at recreational dispensaries, where sales continue to outpace projections. The Nevada Appeal reports the Interim Finance Committee approved an additional $1.5 million for the Department of Taxation to hire more security guards and staff to process background checks for workers at marijuana facilities. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
Nevada pot regulators given more funds to deal with demandNevada's marijuana regulators are trying to keep up with demands at recreational dispensaries, where sales continue to outpace projections
The Associated Press1 day ago
FILE - In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, file photo, warning signs near Provo Bay worn of harmful algae on parts of Utah Lake. Long linked to animal deaths, high doses of the toxins in humans can cause liver damage and attack the nervous system. In the largest outbreaks, hundreds have been sickened by blooms in reservoirs and lakes, and officials in some areas now routinely close bodies of water used for recreation and post warnings when blooms occur. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
Warming drives spread of toxic algae in US, researchers sayToxic algae blooms like one that prompted a recent drinking water advisory in Salem, Oregon, are happening more often and lasting longer across the U.S.
The Associated Press1 day ago
Summer camp illness sends 33 kids, 3 adults to hospitalAuthorities say 33 children and three adults were hospitalized after falling ill during a summer camp in Florida
The Associated Press1 day ago
These Slices of Human Brains Revealed an Alzheimer's ClueIt's not a we-figured-it-out moment, but it may be a clue. Scientists have discovered that two highly common herpes viruses tend to be present in an "increased" way in the brains of people who suffered from Alzheimer's, according to a study published Thursday in Neuron of nearly 1,000 postmortem...
Newser1 day ago
FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, tourists ride a classic convertible car on the Malecon beside the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba. Medical tests have confirmed that one additional U.S. Embassy worker has been affected by mysterious health incidents in Cuba, bringing the total number to 25. That's according to an unclassified notice sent to congressional officials by the State Department. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan, File)
Another US worker confirmed hurt by mystery Cuba incidentsMedical tests have confirmed that one additional U.S. Embassy worker has been affected by mysterious health incidents in Cuba, bringing the total number to 25.
The Associated Press1 day ago
FILE - In this April 12, 2018, file photo, a marijuana plant awaits transplanting at the Hollingsworth Cannabis Company near Shelton, Wash. A national medical group has abruptly canceled plans to train doctors about marijuana for pain relief after a federal agency pulled its funding. The American Academy of Pain Medicine on Thursday, June 21, scrubbed plans for next month’s online course. Spokeswoman Megan Drumm says a request to cancel came from a federal agency. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Pain medicine group cancels doctor training about marijuanaMedical group abruptly cancels plans to train doctors about marijuana for pain relief after a federal agency pulls funding
The Associated Press1 day ago
CORRECTS SPELLING OF LAST NAME TO GRIFFEN INSTEAD OF GRIFFIN - FILE - In this June 9, 2017 photo, Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen speaks at a news conference on the steps of the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock, Ark. The Arkansas Supreme Court on Thursday, June 21, 2018, cleared the way for the state to launch its medical marijuana program, reversing and dismissing Griffen's ruling that prevented officials from issuing the first licenses for businesses to grow the drug. Griffen ruled in March that the state's process for awarding medical marijuana cultivation licenses was unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Andrew DeMillo, File)
Arkansas court clears way for medical pot program's launchThe Arkansas Supreme Court has cleared the way for the state to launch its medical marijuana program
The Associated Press1 day ago
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