Lava Kept Rolling. So Did His CameraDecember 5, 2017 11:15pm

Placed in a crevice at Hawaii's Volcanoes National Park, the camera recorded a lava flow drawing near, nearer, and then too near. In the video, sudden flames spout at the bottom of the screen before obstructing the view as the GoPro Hero4 is swallowed.

A year after the video was posted to YouTube—and more recently popularized after a drone camera met a similar fate—National Geographic explains what happened: While leading visitors on a tour of the park in August 2016, Kilauea EcoGuides owner Erik Storm put his camera down to record a fast-moving lava flow.

That became a "$400 mistake" as, distracted, he told his charges about the Polynesian fire goddess Pele and was too late to pull his camera out of harm's—or Pele's—way.



By the time he returned to the camera, Storm says the lava that had engulfed it had started to cool and harden, so he used a rock hammer to retrieve it.

As the camera is pulled out of the lava, the video shows a screen turning from deep red to a cool blue hue. A man is then seen looking down at the camera.

"When I got home, I hammered all the hardened rock off of the camera and was amazed to see the blue Wi-Fi light still blinking!" Storm writes on Storyful.

And though the camera lens was melted—no surprise given that lava can reach up to 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit in Hawaii, per Live Science—"the footage was intact," Storm says.

The Toronto Star notes you can safely experience a model lava flow at Iceland's Lava Center.

More From Newser

This article originally appeared on Newser: Lava Kept Rolling. So Did His Camera

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Pornhub usage spiked in Hawaii after false ballistic missile alert
200K Antelopes Died Suddenly. Now Scientists Know WhySaiga antelopes have been roaming Central Asia since the time of the woolly mammoth, an achievement only a resilient species could pull off. But now, "total extinction" may be on the horizon. That's according to researchers studying the deaths of more than 200,000 endangered saigas in Kazakhstan in 2015....
President Donald Trump, accompanied by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., speaks to members of the media as they arrive for a dinner at Trump International Golf Club in in West Palm Beach, Fla., Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Lawmakers ask if states or feds should alert about missiles
FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018 file photo provided by Civil Beat, cars drive past a highway sign that says "MISSILE ALERT ERROR THERE IS NO THREAT" on the H-1 Freeway in Honolulu. Gov. David Ige has appointed state Army National Guard Brig. Gen. Kenneth Hara as new head of Hawaii's emergency management agency after a faulty alert was sent to cellphones around the state warning of an incoming missile attack. (Cory Lum/Civil Beat via AP, file)
Tick tock of terror: Timeline of Hawaii missile alert snafu
Georgia mom praised for having 5-year-old daughter 'pay rent'
Muslim teacher's bizarre religious rant, behavior under investigation after cops called to classroom
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices